Essential Studies Program

Philosophy of Essential Studies

Students are members of a broader society dependent on their meaningful contributions for its success. Chadron State College embraces this vision, recognizing the need to serve the region within the context of an increasingly global and more complex world in need of creative solutions to a never-ending supply of challenges and opportunities. The Essential Studies Program at Chadron State provides an integrated, coherent learning experience to prepare students for a life of responsible inquiry.

Institutional Focus Areas and Student Learning Outcomes

Essential Studies Structural Criteria

All first year students will take six (6) course credits of interdisciplinary, issue- or theme-based First Year Inquiry (FYI) to orient them to the Essential Studies Program, critical inquiry, and creative problem solving. This experience may be a single six-credit course or two three-credit courses. It is strongly recommended that students enroll in and complete the six-credit FYI requirement with the first thirty (30) credits taken at CSC.

  1. Students are required to complete three (3) course credits to satisfy each outcome in the Skills, Modes of Inquiry, Personal and Social Responsibility, and Capstone Integration areas (Outcomes 2-12).
  2. Some Essential Studies courses may be team-taught, six-credit interdisciplinary courses that have been approved to address two Essential Studies Outcomes (Outcomes 2-12).
  3. A single three-credit Essential Studies course may be approved to address a maximum of one Essential Studies Outcome.
  4. Up to nine (9) Essential Studies Program credits can apply toward any comprehensive major, while up to six (6) credits can apply toward a subject major. Those same credits can apply to up to 9 hours of a minor.1
  5. Essential Studies requirements may vary based on program. Check the program requirements for the major you are seeking and contact an academic advisor for suggested courses.
  6. Students who have completed an Associate Degree from a regionally accredited institution that includes at least thirty (30) credit hours of general studies courses will have met all Essential Studies requirements. Completion of specific lower division courses may be required in individual degree programs. 
  7. Students who have completed coursework at another accredited institution with no direct transfer equivalent at CSC may petition to receive Essential Studies credit for a given outcome.  Please contact the Student Transition and Retention Team (START) Office (https://www.csc.edu/start/) to request this consideration using the ESP Course Equivalency Form
1

Students majoring in Elementary Education are allowed to overlap up to thirteen (13) credits required for their major with Essential Studies courses

Placement Guidelines for Student Learning Outcomes #1 and #2

A student with an official high school GPA of 2.99 and below will be first enrolled by the Director of the Transitional Studies Program (TSP) into appropriate TSP courses to provide additional support for successful subsequent enrollment into First-Year Inquiry (Outcome #1) and English (Outcome #2) courses. TSP courses do not fulfill Essential Studies SLO #1 or SLO #2 but do fulfill elective CSC degree requirements.

Placement Exam Requirement for Student Learning Outcome #4

Before a student may enroll in any course satisfying SLO 4 (listed below), they are required to take a placement exam developed by the CSC Math Program faculty to determine whether a student is prepared for success in an SLO 4 course. Based on the results of this placement exam, students lacking sufficient preparation will be required to first enroll in and successfully complete the appropriate Transitional Studies Program (TSP) math course(s) suggested by the Math program faculty. TSP math courses do not fulfill the SLO 4 requirement. All TSP courses should be taken as soon as possible. Contact the TSP Director for more information (tsp@csc.edu).

A student may request a placement exam waiver if they meet one of the following criteria:

  1. PRIOR COLLEGE CREDIT – If the student has earned a grade of C-minus or higher in a college-level mathematics course at another college or university, they are not required to take the placement exam. A college transcript is required before the placement exam can be waived. Additional college-level mathematics courses may need to be taken by the student, depending upon the their chosen program of study.
  2. ACT or SAT SCORES – If the student has a math ACT score of 20 or above OR a math SAT score of 1040 or above from a test administered within the last three years, they will be exempt from the placement test.
  3. AP EXAM SCORES – If the student has earned a 3 or higher on the AP Calculus or AP Statistics exam, they will not be required to take the placement exam. A College Board Score Report or high school transcript displaying the AP exam score is required before the placement exam can be waived.
These placement guidelines and requirements apply to both online and campus-based students.
 
Students shall begin any necessary Transitional Studies Program (TSP) coursework in their first semester of enrollment at CSC, with continuous enrollment in those courses until successfully completed.

Student Learning Outcomes and Courses

First Year Inquiry (FYI) (6 course credits)

Student Learning Outcome (SLO) 1

Students will practice skills involved in Critical Inquiry and Creative Problem Solving through interdisciplinary, collaborative engagement of a specific issue or theme.

Select 6 credits from the following:6
HEALTH CARE I: A CHOICE OR A RIGHT (3 credits)
ENEMY MINE: THE EXTREME OTHER (6 credits)
THE NATION AND THE GLOBE (6 credits)
MONSTERS AND MAGIC (6 credits)
ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY: BEYOND THE SOUND BITES (6 credits)
A POX ON YOU: THE BIOLOGICAL, LEGAL AND SOCIAL CONSEQUENCES OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES (6 credits)
MATHLETICS: NOT FOR SPECTATORS (6 credits)
WE ARE WHAT WE EAT (3 credits)
THE HIDDEN LIFE OF EVERYDAY THINGS (3 credits)
A BETTER YOU-THROUGH FINANCIAL AND PHYSICAL HEALTH (6 credits)
VIRTUE AND THE WARRIOR SPIRIT (6 credits)
10,000 B.C., GREAT PLAINS, NORTH AMERICA: HUMAN SURVIVAL AND THE ENVIRONMENT (6 credits)
PRIVATE PARTS: THE PSYCHOSOCIAL AND BIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF SEXUALITY (6 credits)
HEALTH CARE II: A CHOICE OR A RIGHT (3 credits)
STUDY OF NATURAL DISASTERS (3 credits)
NUTRITION, WEIGHT LOSS AND WELLNESS (3 credits)
LITERATURE AND PRACTICE OF WORLD RELIGIONS (6 credits)
SURVIVAL SKILLS 101 (3 credits)
PLANTS, BEVERAGES-HUMAN HISTORY (3 credits)
FORGIVENESS (3 credits)
HOME ON THE RANGE (6 credits)
LEARNING TO SERVE (3 credits)
THE 20TH CENTURY AMERICAN ROAD (6 credits)
FOOTBALL, AMERICAN STYLE (6 credits)
HAPPINESS (6 credits)
STUDY THE WORLD (3 credits)
ANALYZING ADOLESCENCE (3 credits)
FASHIONOMICS (3 credits)
RELATIONSHIPS 2.0 (3 credits)
INTO THE MARTIAL ARTS (6 credits)
TOPICS IN FIRST YEAR INQUIRY (3-6 credits)
MATTERS OF OPINION (3 credits)
ZOMBIEPOCALYPSE; ZOMBIES IN POPULAR CULTURE (3 credits)
GAZE ANATOMY: GENDER, RACE, SEXUALITY AND CLASS IN MEDIA (3 credits)
MUSIC AND THE MIND (3 credits)
HOW TO READ A FILM (3 credits)
HOW TO LEARN ANYTHING (6 credits)
HUMANS AND ANIMALS: FRIENDS OR FOES? (3 credits)
THEATRE AS A COLLABORATIVE ART FORM (3 credits)
HEALTHY SKEPTICISM (3 credits)
ANCIENT MONUMENTS (3 credits)
VULCANS AND VOLCANOLOGY (3 credits)
OPENING PANDORA'S MUSIC BOX (3 credits)
Total Credits6

Skills (12 course credits)

Students will develop intellectual and practical skills, including proficiency in written, oral, and visual communication; inquiry techniques; critical and creative thinking; quantitative techniques and applications; information acquisition and assessment; teamwork; and problem-solving.

Student Learning Outcome (SLO) 2

Students will use writing as a tool for learning and thinking, and will compose texts that address diverse writing situations purposefully, making appropriate use of evidence and conventions, including Standard Edited English.

Select one of the following:3
RHETORIC AND WRITING
TOPICS IN WRITING
TECHNICAL WRITING
Total Credits3

NOTE: Students pursuing select programs of study may need to complete two courses in this skill set; see individual program requirements for details.

Student Learning Outcome (SLO) 3

Students will demonstrate communication competence in two or more of the following ways:

  1. by making oral presentations with supporting materials,
  2. by leading and participating in problem-solving teams,
  3. by employing a repertoire of communication skills for developing and maintaining professional and personal relationships, or
  4. by employing listening skills.
Select one of the following:3
BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS
FUNDAMENTALS OF ORAL COMMUNICATION
INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION
PUBLIC SPEAKING
COMMUNICATING IN GROUPS AND TEAMS
CONFLICT RESOLUTION AND MEDIATION
ADDICTION COUNSELING WITH GROUPS
ADDICTION COUNSELING THEORIES AND TECHNIQUES
Total Credits3

Student Learning Outcome (SLO) 4

Students will demonstrate the application of mathematical terminology, expressions, and logical reasoning abilities to model, draw inferences, and to mathematically solve problems within our world.

This SLO requires that a student first take a placement exam (see “Placement Exam Requirement for Student Learning Outcome #4,” above.)

Advisors: see table below for advising suggestions based on high school mathematics background.

Select one of the following:3
INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICS
PLANE TRIGONOMETRY
PRE-CALCULUS MATHEMATICS
MATHEMATICS TOPICS FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS
APPLIED CALCULUS
COLLEGE ALGEBRA (4 credits)
CALCULUS I (5 credits)
APPLIED STATISTICS
DISCRETE MATHEMATICS
SYMBOLIC LOGIC
STATISTICS FOR PSYCHOLOGY


ADVISORS: Once the student has demonstrated eligibility to enroll in an SLO 4 course, the following table (based on high school mathematics background) can be used as guidelines for enrollment. All courses are three (3) credits unless otherwise noted:
 

High School Background Additional Guidelines for Enrollment in SLO 4 courses
No Algebra MATH 133 Introduction to Mathematics.
One (1) Year Algebra MATH 137 Math Topics for Elementary Teachers (if El. Ed. Major) OR MATH 232 Applied Statistics OR PHIL 233 Symbolic Logics OR PSYC 240 Statistics for Psychology.
One (1) Year Algebra and One (1) Year Geometry MATH 142 College Algebra (4 credits) OR PHIL 233 Symbolic Logic OR PSYC 240 Statistics for Psychology
Two (2) Years Algebra MATH 138 Applied Calculus OR MATH 142 College Algebra (4 credits) OR MATH 232 Applied Statistics OR PHIL 233 Symbolic Logics OR PSYC 240 Statistics for Psychology.
Two (2) Years Algebra and One (1) Year Geometry MATH 134 Plane Trigonometry OR MATH 135 Pre-Calculus Mathematics OR PHIL 233 Symbolic Logics OR PSYC 240 Statistics for Psychology.
Four (4) Years Math (including Trigonometry) MATH 138 Applied Calculus OR MATH 151 Calculus I (5 credits) OR MATH 232 Applied Statistics, OR MATH 239 Discrete Mathematics OR PHIL 233 Symbolic Logics OR PSYC 240 Statistics for Psychology.


Note: MATH 101 PRE-ALGEBRA and MATH 102 PRE-COLLEGE ALGEBRA are Transitional Studies Program (TSP) courses: they do not fulfill SLO 4 but do fulfill CSC elective degree requirements.

Student Learning Outcome (SLO) 5

Students will practice one or more creative art forms, such as music, theatre, creative writing, visual art, and the design arts.

Select three credits from the following:3
DRAWING FOR THE NON-MAJOR
CERAMICS FOR THE NON ART MAJOR
SCULPTURE FOR THE NON ART MAJOR
BLACK AND WHITE PHOTOGRAPHY
INTRO TO GRAPHIC DESIGN
FIBER ARTS I
GRAPHIC DESIGN-SOFTWARE
DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY
ORAL INTERPRETATION & PERFORMANCE STUDIES
AUDIO PRODUCTION
VIDEO PRODUCTION
BROADCAST PRODUCTION
INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
INTERMEDIATE CREATIVE WRITING: NONFICTION
INTERMEDIATE CREATIVE WRITING: FICTION
INTERMEDIATE CREATIVE WRITING: POETRY
EXHIBIT DESIGN
WIND SYMPHONY (repeatable)
CONCERT CHOIR (repeatable)
KEYBOARD ENSEMBLE (repeatable)
GUITAR ENSEMBLE (repeatable)
CHADRON STATE COMMUNITY SYMPHONIC BAND
GUITAR CLASS
VOICE CLASS FOR NON-MAJORS
THE VIRTUAL MUSICIAN
BASIC PIANO SKILLS
WIND SYMPHONY (repeatable)
CONCERT CHOIR (repeatable)
GUITAR ENSEMBLE (repeatable)
PRINCIPLES OF ACTING
COSTUME CONSTRUCTION
TECHNICAL THEATRE
and TECHNICAL THEATRE LABORATORY
STAGE MAKE-UP
INTRODUCTION TO COSTUME DESIGN
INTRODUCTION TO LIGHTING DESIGN
and INTRODUCTION TO LIGHTING DESIGN LABORATORY
Total Credits3

Modes of Inquiry (9 Course Credits)

Students will build understanding of the human condition within its social and natural contexts.

Student Learning Outcome (SLO) 6

Students will employ scientific methodology to analyze and explain how the natural world functions and how humans interact with it.

Select one of the following:3
RANGELAND HYDROLOGY
GENERAL BIOLOGY I
and GENERAL BIOLOGY I LABORATORY
GENERAL BIOLOGY II
and GENERAL BIOLOGY II LABORATORY
HUMAN BIOLOGY
and HUMAN BIOLOGY LABORATORY
BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE
and BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE LABORATORY
GENERAL BIOLOGY: BOTANY
and GENERAL BIOLOGY: BOTANY LABORATORY
GENERAL BIOLOGY: ZOOLOGY
and GENERAL BIOLOGY: ZOOLOGY LABORATORY
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
FOOD SCIENCE
and FOOD SCIENCE LABORATORY
PHYSICAL SCIENCE FOR ELEMENTARY AND MIDDLE GRADES TEACHER
EARTH SCIENCE
NATURAL HAZARDS AND DISASTERS
PHYSICAL SCIENCE
ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY
ASTRONOMY
and ASTRONOMY LABORATORY
PLANETARY GEOLOGY
PHYSICAL GEOLOGY
and PHYSICAL GEOLOGY LABORATORY
EARTH SYSTEM HISTORY
and EARTH SYSTEM HISTORY LABORATORY
METEOROLOGY
INTRODUCTION TO BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
Total Credits3

Student Learning Outcome (SLO) 7

Students will examine the human condition by exploring cultural and aesthetic achievements illustrated in at least one of the disciplines in the humanities:

  • visual and performing arts
  • literature
  • history
  • philosophy
  • religion
  • interdisciplinary humanities
Select one of the following:3
ELEMENTS OF ART
PROFESSIONAL ETHICS
HISTORY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE TO 1865
HISTORY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE FROM 1865
ELEMENTS OF LITERATURE
HISTORY OF BRITISH LITERATURE TO 1795
HISTORY OF BRITISH LITERATURE FROM 1795
CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE
LITERATURE OF THE AMERICAN WEST
LITERATURE AND PHILOSOPHY
LITERATURE OF THE ENVIRONMENT
GENDER, SEXUALITY, AND LITERATURE
NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE
NOVELS
MAJOR WRITERS
WORLD HISTORY TO 1500
ANCIENT WEST
ANCIENT EAST ASIA
HUMANISTIC PERSPECTIVES
HUMANISTIC TRADITION I:CLASSICAL WORLD
HUMANISTIC TRADITION II: THE MEDIEVAL WORLD AND RENAISSANCE
HUMANISTIC TRADITION III:THE AGE OF ENLIGHTENMENT AND ROMANTICISM
THE HUMANISTIC TRADITION IV:MODERNISM AND POST-MODERNISM
BEAT CULTURE: FILM, PHILOSOPHY, LITERATURE
FILM AND PHILOSOPHY
MODERNISM AND MANIFESTOS
CUBA LIBRE'
MUSEUM EDUCATION
MUSIC APPRECIATION
HISTORY OF JAZZ
INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY
BIOMEDICAL ETHICS
ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS
PHILOSOPHY ON THE RANGE
ETHICS
HISTORY OF POLITICAL THOUGHT
THEATRE HISTORY I
Total Credits3

Student Learning Outcome (SLO) 8

Students will study human behavior and social interactions integrating knowledge, theories, methods, or historical perspectives appropriate to the social sciences.

Select one of the following:3
GREAT PLAINS 2
US HISTORY TO 1877
US HISTORY SINCE 1877
WORLD HISTORY SINCE 1500
EUROPE: RENAISSANCE TO WORLD WAR
EUROPE SINCE 1914
US COLONIAL AND EARLY REPUBLIC
US IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
US IN THE 20TH CENTURY
NORTH AMERICAN WEST
NEBRASKA HISTORY
AMERICAN INDIAN HISTORY
AMERICAN ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY
HISTORY OF CANADA
HISTORY OF MEXICO
MODERN EAST ASIA
HISTORY OF THE PACIFIC RIM
HISTORY OF THE MIDDLE EAST
HISTORY OF AFRICA
LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY
CUBA LIBRE'
HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS
INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL SCIENCE
U.S. POLITICS AND GOVERNMENT
RURAL AND FRONTIER POLITICAL ECONOMY
THEATRE HISTORY II
Total Credits3
2

Must be taken concurrently with CAP 469C1 GREAT PLAINS in SLO #12.

Personal and Social Responsibility (9 course credits)

Students will demonstrate individual and social responsibility through the critical examination of wellness; study of ethical principles and reasoning; application of civic knowledge; interaction with diverse cultures; and engagement with global issues.

Student Learning Outcome (SLO) 9

Students will apply theories and principles of ethics and citizenship through the study of or participation in civic affairs.

Select one of the following:3
PERSONAL INCOME TAX
TALK DIRTY TO ME
EVENT PLANNING AND LEADERSHIP
DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
SOCIAL MEDIA AND DEMOCRATIZATION 3
THE ART OF RHETORIC
WORKSITE WELLNESS
EPIDEMIOLOGY AND GLOBAL HEALTH
ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT
WORLD ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES
SUBJECT AND CITIZEN
PHILOSOPHY AND DOCUMENTARY FILM
INTRODUCTION TO THE ARMY
and INTRODUCTION TO THE ARMY LABORATORY
MUSIC AND CIVIC ENGAGEMENT
ETHICS, SOCIETY AND CURRENT ISSUES
CIVIL DISCOURSE AND CIVIC VIRTUE
U.S. POLITICS AND CIVIC ENGAGEMENT
CIVIC ENGAGEMENT: THEORY AND PRACTICE
Total Credits3
3

Must be taken concurrently with CAP 469G2 SOCIAL MEDIA AND DEMOCRATIZATION in SLO #12.

Student Learning Outcome (SLO) 10

Students will demonstrate knowledge of human diversity and interconnectedness and will analyze the implications of diversity in its various economic, cultural, social or political forms.

Select one of the following:3
AGRICULTURAL POLICY
INTRO TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY
ETHNOBOTANY
INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION
GENDER AND COMMUNICATION
GLOBALIZATION, CULTURE AND MEDIA
HOW TO SAVE THE RAINFOREST 4
CROSS CULTURAL STUDIES/JUSTICE STUDIES
ADDICTION COUNSELING ETHICS AND DIVERSITY
SURVEY OF ECONOMICS
AGRICULTURAL POLICY
COMPARATIVE EDUCATION
GRAPHIC NOVEL: STUDIES IN DIVERSITY AND DIFFERENCE
MULTI-ETHNIC LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
LITERATURE OF THE BIBLE
WORLD LITERATURE
CROSS-CULTURAL STUDIES/LITERATURE
FAMILIES IN SOCIETY
AGING AND DEATH
LOSS ACROSS THE LIFESPAN
GLOBAL FOOD SYSTEMS
PERSONAL FINANCE
INTERNATIONAL FINANCE AND ECONOMICS
THE POST-COLONIAL CONDITION
CUBA LIBRE'
COMPARATIVE RELIGIONS
HIGH PLAINS HUMANITIES
LAW AND THE AMERICAN SOCIETY
AMERICAN POPULAR MUSIC
PHILOSOPHY OF GENDER
GLOBAL POLITICS
STUDY ABROAD IN POLITICS
ISLAM AND POLITICS
CULTURE AND PSYCHOLOGY
SOCIETY: GLOBAL COMPARISONS
INTERNATIONAL SOCIAL WELFARE
CONVERSATIONAL FOREIGN LANGUAGE
Total Credits3
4

Must be taken concurrently with CAP 469A2 HOW TO SAVE THE RAINFOREST in SLO #12.

Student Learning Outcome (SLO) 11

Students will discuss current health issues and incorporate wellness practices that lead to positive personal changes in health and wellness lifestyle.

Select one of the following:3
MEDICAL AND PSYCHOSOCIAL ADDICTION ASPECTS
NUTRITION
LIFESPAN WELLNESS
INDIVIDUAL SPORT ACTIVITIES
FITNESS ACTIVITIES
SOCIAL DANCE ACTIVITIES
OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES
TEAM SPORTS ACTIVITIES
PERSONAL HEALTH/WELLNESS
MILITARY FITNESS
Total Credits3

Capstone Integration (3 course credits)

Students will integrate Essential Studies skills, knowledge and abilities, adapting them to new settings, questions, and responsibilities.

Student Learning Outcome (SLO) 12

Students will complete a culminating experience that illustrates effective application of their Essential Studies skills, modes of inquiry and personal and social responsibility through one of the following projects:

  • An Essential Studies Capstone course (CAP 469 prefix) where students produce a creative or scholarly work requiring broad knowledge, appropriate technical proficiency, information collection, interpretation, synthesis, presentation, and reflection that grows out of interdisciplinary, collaborative engagement of a specific issue or theme. Approved courses also appear on the Essential Studies Program website, and include:
    Select one of the following: 53
    HOW TO SAVE THE RAIN FOREST (6 credits)
    HOW TO SAVE THE RAINFOREST (3 credits) 6
    CUBA LIBRE' (3-6 credits)
    GREAT PLAINS (3 credits)
    GREAT PLAINS (3 credits) 7
    WEIGHT OF THE NATION (3-6 credits)
    OUTSIDE:YOUR SELF IN THE WORLD (3 credits)
    TALKING HEADS (6 credits)
    SOCIAL MEDIA AND DEMOCRATIZATION (6 credits)
    SOCIAL MEDIA AND DEMOCRATIZATION (3 credits) 8
    POETICS AND PHILOSOPHY OF WALKING (3 credits)
    COMPOSING A PUBLIC LIFE (3 credits)
    TOPICS IN CAPSTONE INTEGRATION (3-6 credits)
    THE CREATIVE MIND (3-6 credits)
    PROJECT SLiM:SERVICE LEARNING MATH (3 credits)
    SPORTS REPORTERS (3 credits)
    Total Credits3
    5

    Some CAP courses may be offered for more than three credits to satisfy previous catalog requirements or to facilitate team-teaching. See your advisor to determine how the additional credits will be applied.

    6

    Must be taken concurrently with CAP 469A1 HOW TO SAVE THE RAINFOREST in SLO #10.

    7

    Must be taken concurrently with CAP 469C2 GREAT PLAINS in SLO #8.

    8

    Must be taken concurrently with CAP 469G1 SOCIAL MEDIA AND DEMOCRATIZATION in SLO #9.

OR 

  • A capstone, independent study or other advanced-project course within a specific department or program that meets SLO #12 criteria and has been approved by the Essential Studies Program committee. Successful completion of the project will include a presentation illustrating the application of Capstone Integration outcomes as outlined on the Essential Studies Program website. 
Select three credits of the following:3
BIOLOGY CAPSTONE
CAPSTONE I: RESEARCH SEMINAR (1 credit)
CAPSTONE II: SENIOR RESEARCH (1 credit)
CAPSTONE III: SENIOR RESEARCH/THESIS (1 credit)
EDUCATION CAPSTONE 9
PROFESSIONAL CAREER DEVELOPMENT
STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT
Total Credits3
9

  Must be taken concurrently with EDUC 490 TEACHER INTERNSHIP - STUDENT TEACHING.